Ryeland Family Tree

The Genealogy of the Ryeland and connected Families

Notes


Matches 201 to 250 of 8,359

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
201 "The regiment remained at the places mentioned above. Lieutenant-Colonel Teulon exchanged to half-pay in December, which Lieutenant-Colonel George Leigh Goldie, who assumed command of the regiment. MCNALTY, Michael (I43)
 
202 "To adopt and endeavor to carry into execution whatever measures may be recommended by the Continental Congress and resolved by our Provincial Convention for purpose and preserving our Constitution and opposing the execution of the several Arbitrary Acts of British Parliament, until a reconciliation between Great Britain and America on Constitutional principals (which we most ardently desire) can be obtained and that we will in all things follow the advice of our General Committee respecting the purposes aforesaid, the preservation of peace and good order and the safety of individuals and property." ROBLIN, Philip UE (I4013)
 
203 "Turnhout, Tillburg etc. & take up position in Holland near Nijmegen just 12 miles from Germany" POLLEY, Gordon Bradbury (I2107)
 
204 "Turnhout, Tillburg etc. & take up position in Holland near Nijmegen just 12 miles from Germany" POLLEY, Gordon Bradbury (I2107)
 
205 "Turnhout, Tillburg etc. & take up position in Holland near Nijmegen just 12 miles from Germany" POLLEY, Gordon Bradbury (I2107)
 
206 "When I was 7 years old my father died and I went to live with my grandparents who lived in a town 100 miles away from Toronto. During the school summer holidays I would move back to my home in Toronto to be with my mother, brothers and sister.

While living with my grandparents I formed a regular pattern of attending Church and Sunday School and sang in the Choir.

While I was 12 years old I moved back to Toronto to live permanently and then reversed the former procedure by spending the summer school holidays with my grandparents. At that time I stopped attending Sunday School but did attend Church. The services seemed to have little meaning. At 16 I was confirmed by again although it was a moving experience I feel there was something lacking.

I as invited to attend the young peoples meetings at that Church which I did. This was where I met my wife to be.

I heard the gospel preached in Church regularly but I did not respond and resisted the invitations to attempt the Lord Jesus as my Saviour.

At the Church and young peoples we had a succession of Curate assistants. Finally a C.A. by he name of Maurice Murphy arrived and dramatic changes began to be made. As I look back I see how the Holy Sprit was at work in my life and before very long through the ministry of Maurice Murphy I was no longer resisting the Holy Sprit and the gospel messages and gave my life to the Lord Jesus. My wife to be, Betty, was also converted at this time.

During the years which followed the hand of God guided me along the path of my life and Bible study and prayer became important parts of my daily life.

I had 4 years of service in World War 2 where I was protected by the hand of God.

Returning from the war years in Europe Betty and I were married in 1946 and were blessed with 2 children - a boy and a girl both of whom committed their lives to Christ.

In 1960 I lost my job as the firm I was working with went out of business as they were no longer operating at a profit. After much prayer God directed me to start my own business which I am still doing.

In 1976 our son was killed in a car accident. Our faith in God was such we accepted this as part of His plan. At this time we felt the power of prayer as our friends upheld us before God.

The Christian life of course just goes on and on and each day there is a new opportunity to serve God. Each one of us is given certian talents and capabilities and we should be ready to be used by Him as opportunities arise. With our lives yielded to Him and praying for guidance day by day He will direct our paths." 
POLLEY, Gordon Bradbury (I2107)
 
207 "William Grantham, labourer of Cottingham, be transported to one of His Majesty's plantations or colonies abroad for the term of seven years from this sessions, the said William Grantham having been found guilty of stealing nine dead ducks and one fowl."
A report in the Hull Advertiser on the 10«sup»th«/sup» April 1831 stated that:
"Grantham appeared to be connected with a set of people in the habit of taking poultry and disposing of it to Hull agents, and in the hope of breaking up a gang at Cottingham who carried out these operations on such a scale as to render it impossible to keep poultry in the neighbourhood he was sentenced to seven years transportation."
He was convicted at York on the 4«sup»th«/sup» April 1831, and was transported on the ship "Elizabeth"
which left London on the 7«sup»th«/sup» October 1831 with 220 male convicts on board, and arrived in Tasmania on the 14«sup»th«/sup» February 1832. The Tasmanian convict records state that he was transported for "Stealing 10 Fowls, Gaol Report - Character and Disposition Bad, imprisoned before, Hulk Report - orderly, married 2 Children - This offence……………………6 months Easter…………………… He is described as a gardener, aged 34 years, 5'8" tall, dark complexion, dark brown hair including thin whiskers, narrow visage, low wrinkled forehead, dark brown eyebrows and hazel eyes, long nose with a rise on the bridge, wide mouth, long projecting chin, and lame in his right leg. His conduct in Tasmania is described as follows:
June 4 1834, Swanston / Insolence to his master and saying that he would rather be sent in to the Governor to be sen[tenced] and kept to hard labour for 3 Months……………………………and then to be assigned to the interior / APM / New Commissioner NM/
Tippling (Drinking) in the skittle grounds of Mr Rayners Licensed House, Admonished, his previous character being good/
December 28«sup»th«/sup» 1835 Thomson /Misconduct his making use of abusive language to Overseer Vickers this Morning admonished………………..
February 13«sup»th«/sup» 1837 Lascelles, Extreme Insolence and Very Abusive Language.
Admonished. C. Arthur
September 27«sup»th«/sup» 1837 Misconduct in being in the town contrary to orders, repts., HBJ.

He somehow managed to return to Cottingham and was buried there on the 15«sup»th«/sup» of December 1869. There is a reference to his capture for the offence in the Treasurers records which states that a William Spenceley was paid the sum of £1-17-1d, his costs for apprehending William Grantham charged with Felony. 
GRANTHAM, William (I13655)
 
208 "William John Fryday was born at Clune, Ballagh, Gooldscross, which is south of Thurles. He was the son of James Fryday & Eliza Hayes. The farm at Ballydoe (this is what the family call Aughvallydeagh, milestone) appears to have belonged to Eliza Hayes who left bits of farms to her sons and required of them that they provided a very large sum each for their only sister, Sarah.
What puzzles us is that Ballydoe was not a small miserable boggy holding, but was a fine 300acre hold where Aunt Lizzie had her training track for her racehorses!!!!! It was sold in 1908 in two parts - the Greene family bought 180 acres of it and still own it!
Regards,
Barbara" 
FRYDAY, William Jack (I3801)
 
209 # 17610-02 Family F3674
 
210 # Hannah ("Ann") Jane Middlebrook (1850-October 15, 1879) Married George Fitchett (1856--1933)

1. Jane Fitchett (Dec. 15, 1876--June 28, 1963) married Albert Sopher(b. Nov. 3, 1867--September 29, 1949) on August 27, 1894

# Hannah had a second husband, William Kaake (b. 1852) whom she married on September 10, 1872.

1. Joshua Kaake (December 6, 1876--1925) married Sarah Cripps 
MIDDLEBROOK, Hannah (I37986)
 
211 # Vol 10 pg 55 Family F3676
 
212 # William Middlebrook (1822-1910) married Jane Pringle (1823-1911) William was a farmer, who in 1871 owned a hundred acres of land in Sunnidale, Simcoe County. He had 1 cow, 2 sheep, 1 pig and they manufactured 100 lbs. of butter and 12 pounds of wool. William could not read or write and he died at his residence in Sunnidale. On his death record it said he was a pioneer. Their children: (All we found)

1. George (1848-1912) Died in Sunnidale 2. Elizabeth (1852-1945) Married Henry Stewart in Barrie in 1875. She is buried in Glencairn cemetery.

 
MIDDLEBROOK, William (I37977)
 
213 #003595-78 George F. PRETTY, 25, not given, Belleville, same, widower, s/o Henry & Catharine PRETTY, married Nellie ALFORD, 30, Brideslow England, Belleville, d/o Walter & Elizabeth ALFORD, witn: D.D. CHIDISTER & Lillie MURPHY, both of Trenton, 10 Dec 1877 at Trenton Family F1484
 
214 #012087-84 George W. Scott 24 res. Buffalo b. Lockport NY railway clerk s/o Alex and Ellen Scott married 11/11/1884 Bertie Twp to Adaline Roblin 26 res Bertie Twp b. Caistor Twp d/o George and Francis Roblin. Witness: Georgia and Catherine Roblin ROBLIN, Ethel A (I9200)
 
215 #027803-03 James Henry PRENTICE, male born 5 December 1903 to James PRENTICE and Mary Ann SCHELL. No physician. Informant-W H Shubrook?. Occupation and residence of father-lumberman, lot 26, conc 8. Registered 31 December 1903. PRENTICE, James Henry (I37838)
 
216 #029962-87 (Prince Edward Co) ROBLIN, William, m, b. 28 Aug.1887, father - Donald ROBLIN, miller; mother - Ella DELONG, infm - D. Roblin, Ameliasburg ROBLIN, William (I10943)
 
217 #3818-79 Hastings Co. Madoc On Can Family F3655
 
218 'Rogers' was Rose's former married name. Her maiden name is unknown. She is now deceased. ROGERS, Rose (I8870)
 
219 ("Lena") PITTS, Helena (I2704)
 
220 (A Lodging House) WOOD, Maria (I8915)
 
221 (AFN:GZZK-ZS)



 
BAKER, Mary (I15596)
 
222 (AFN:GZZL-0X)



 
BAKER, Elizabeth (I14371)
 
223 (AFN:GZZL-14)



 
BAKER, Ann (I14372)
 
224 (AFN:GZZL-3G)



 
BAKER, Susannah (I14373)
 
225 (AFN:H00K-0T)



 
TOES, Richard (I14416)
 
226 (AFN:H013-R0)



 
BAKER, Jane (I14425)
 
227 (AFN:H013-S5)



 
BAKER, Martha (I14426)
 
228 (AFN:H013-TB)



 
BAKER, Elizabeth (I14430)
 
229 (AFN:H013-VH)

Also have possible birthdate of 1674.



 
BAKER, Jane (I14437)
 
230 (AFN:H013-WN



 
BAKER, Mary (I14438)
 
231 (AFN:H013-XT)



 
BAKER, Robert (I14440)
 
232 (AFN:H013-Z1)



 
BAKER, William (I14441)
 
233 (AFN:H014-05)



 
BAKER, Robert (I14443)
 
234 (AFN:H014-3N)



 
BAKER, Henry (I14445)
 
235 (AFN:H014-4T)



 
BAKER, Sarah (I14446)
 
236 (Born Wm. Thompson and not blood relative of Roblin's)
 
ROBLIN, William Thompson (I9906)
 
237 (Grave 22,589, square 36) DOULTON, Sir Henry (I2212)
 
238 (Hard to make out on image) RYELAND, William Richard (I3203)
 
239 (Honiton is modern name) Family F3221
 
240 (Is this him?) MONTEATH, William (I8573)
 
241 (Location 1, 808, 40) - draped urn atop a red granite column DOULTON, John (I2209)
 
242 (Medical):10 Years in hospital prior to death in 1945 according to funeral home records. MCNAUGHTON, John James (I4529)
 
243 (Medical):1a. Carcinoma of Pancreas (Pancreatic Cancer)
b. Crebral Metastases (Brain Cancer)
2. Acute Endocarditis (inflammation of the inner heart valves)

Geoffrey Edwin Ryeland present at the death as informant 
RYELAND, Albert Edwin (I2785)
 
244 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. KINNEAR, Robert Shane (I3797)
 
245 (Medical):Apoplexy is an outdated medical term, which can be used to mean 'bleeding'. It can be used non-medically to mean a state of extreme rage or excitement. The word derives from the Greek word for 'seizure', apople-xia, in the sense of being struck down.

Historical meaning

Historically, the word "apoplexy" was also used to describe any sudden death that began with a sudden loss of consciousness, especially one in which the victim died within a matter of seconds after losing consciousness. Those reading historical documents should take into consideration the possibility that the word "apoplexy" may be used to describe the symptom of sudden loss of consciousness immediately preceding death and not an actual verified disease process. Sudden cardiac deaths, ruptured cerebral aneurysms, certain ruptured aortic aneurysms, and even heart attacks may have been described as apoplexy in the past.

Hemorrhage

The term 'apoplexy' is used to describe bleeding within internal organs. In such usage it is coupled with an adjective describing the site of the bleeding. For example, bleeding within the pituitary gland is called pituitary apoplexy, and bleeding within the adrenal glands can be called adrenal apoplexy.

In both pituitary and adrenal apoplexy, the word apoplexy refers to both hemorrhage with the gland and to accompanying neurological problems such as confusion, headache, and impairment of consciousness. 
IVES, Letitia (I1642)
 
246 (Medical):Apoplexy is an outdated medical term, which can be used to mean 'bleeding'. It can be used non-medically to mean a state of extreme rage or excitement. The word derives from the Greek word for 'seizure', apople-xia, in the sense of being struck down.

Historical meaning

Historically, the word "apoplexy" was also used to describe any sudden death that began with a sudden loss of consciousness, especially one in which the victim died within a matter of seconds after losing consciousness. Those reading historical documents should take into consideration the possibility that the word "apoplexy" may be used to describe the symptom of sudden loss of consciousness immediately preceding death and not an actual verified disease process. Sudden cardiac deaths, ruptured cerebral aneurysms, certain ruptured aortic aneurysms, and even heart attacks may have been described as apoplexy in the past.

Hemorrhage

The term 'apoplexy' is used to describe bleeding within internal organs. In such usage it is coupled with an adjective describing the site of the bleeding. For example, bleeding within the pituitary gland is called pituitary apoplexy, and bleeding within the adrenal glands can be called adrenal apoplexy.

In both pituitary and adrenal apoplexy, the word apoplexy refers to both hemorrhage with the gland and to accompanying neurological problems such as confusion, headache, and impairment of consciousness.
 
RYELAND, James (I1660)
 
247 (Medical):Apoplexy is an outdated medical term, which can be used to mean 'bleeding'. It can be used non-medically to mean a state of extreme rage or excitement. The word derives from the Greek word for 'seizure', apople-xia, in the sense of being struck down.

Historical meaning

Historically, the word "apoplexy" was also used to describe any sudden death that began with a sudden loss of consciousness, especially one in which the victim died within a matter of seconds after losing consciousness. Those reading historical documents should take into consideration the possibility that the word "apoplexy" may be used to describe the symptom of sudden loss of consciousness immediately preceding death and not an actual verified disease process. Sudden cardiac deaths, ruptured cerebral aneurysms, certain ruptured aortic aneurysms, and even heart attacks may have been described as apoplexy in the past.

Hemorrhage

The term 'apoplexy' is used to describe bleeding within internal organs. In such usage it is coupled with an adjective describing the site of the bleeding. For example, bleeding within the pituitary gland is called pituitary apoplexy, and bleeding within the adrenal glands can be called adrenal apoplexy.

In both pituitary and adrenal apoplexy, the word apoplexy refers to both hemorrhage with the gland and to accompanying neurological problems such as confusion, headache, and impairment of consciousness.
 
JAMES, Sarah (I3232)
 
248 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. RYELAND, Aaron Joseph Bradbury (I37814)
 
249 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. RYELAND, Elizabeth Anne (I37803)
 
250 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. RYELAND, Jackson Timothy (I37502)
 

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